Minimal Compliance Requirements LLCs are subject to limited state mandated annual filing requirements and ongoing formalities. While corporations are typically required to have at least an annual meeting of directors and shareholders (and initial meeting of the same), adopt bylaws, and keep minutes of all meetings and all formal corporate resolutions, an LLC is not required to do any of those things (see the explanation of an operating agreement, above). The LLC members may have whatever meetings they wish and may document any such things as they wish, however they are not required to do so.
General liability insurance is not typically a legal requirement, but it is very strongly recommended. This policy protects your business assets from lawsuits-without it, a legal claim could force your company out of business entirely. A general liability insurance policy covers injuries, property damage, personal liabilities, advertising liabilities, and legal defense and judgment.
General liability insurance is not typically a legal requirement, but it is very strongly recommended. This policy protects your business assets from lawsuits-without it, a legal claim could force your company out of business entirely. A general liability insurance policy covers injuries, property damage, personal liabilities, advertising liabilities, and legal defense and judgment.
Another important component when you are determining how to form an LLC is the creation of an LLC operating agreement. While operating agreements are not required under state law when forming an LLC and do not have to be filed with the state, they are very important documents to create because they help you and any other members of the LLC organize your business, plan for the future, and put all pertinent facts in writing.
Some businesses are prevented from forming an LLC, however. Typically financial companies such as banks, financial trust companies and insurance agencies can't file as an LLC. LLCs are sometimes limited for industries in certain states, too. For example, if you live in California, you can't form an LLC if you're an architect, accountant or licensed health care provider. Check out our LLC information by state for more details on your state.
The articles of organization also should include information about how your LLC will be managed. You need to indicate whether the members of the LLC will do hands-on management or if there will be hired management. Another requirement is to discuss how long the LLC will be in existence (there is no limit on this, so it is fine to say in perpetuity).
Agent Name- The name of the current primary contact for this business. It is the 'statutory agent name' for Corporations, Limited Partnerships, Limited Liability Companies, Business Trusts, Real Estate Trusts and Limited Liability Partnerships. It is the 'registrant name' for Trade Names, Trade Marks, Service Marks, Fictitious Names and Marks of Ownership.
Need a simple, non-legalese “executor" definition? An executor is the person who handles a deceased person's estate, making sure all property is distributed according to the decedent's wishes and that all debts are paid. Usually, executors are close family members of the deceased—spouses, children, parents, or siblings—but the person writing a will (the “testator") can choose anyone to fulfill this role.
Indicate your LLC's initial registered agent and registered office. State law requires your LLC to have a registered agent and a registered office in Wisconsin on whom legal process can be served and to whom official documents can be sent. Your registered agent must be located at the registered office, which must be in Wisconsin and represent the physical business address of your registered agent.[8]
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